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bookmania:

“Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or bed - no escape. Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimeters in your skull.”― George Orwell, 1984

bookmania:

“Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or bed - no escape. Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimeters in your skull.”George Orwell, 1984

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For any of my followers that may have noticed, I’m sorry that I’ve been away so long. I got too lazy to log out of my other tumblr, and I was (am) avoiding all things concerning the 50th Anniversary for Doctor Who (still need to catch up, I know, bad on me) and the new Sherlock season.

I’ll try to be around more often (especially since I hit 50k of my book and that’s exciting to share with people) but I gotta avoid the “I already know the feels before the feels are real” thing.

Much love!

Filed under been away sorry tumblr doctor who sherlock writing 50k feels missing you

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bookmania:

Any Amount of Books on Charing Cross Road, London in a street committed to ­bookselling, this shop stands out for its rapid turnover, eclectic stock and reasonable prices. Outside, there are £1 paperbacks and the basement is given over to ­bargains. Curiosities are paraded in the window display, which alters daily, and the main shop floor is a general mix of literature and non-fiction. For £10-£15 you can buy tooled leather bindings to give your living room that stately home library ambience. A different stock is available in an online catalogue. 56 Charing Cross Road, London (Anna Tims)

bookmania:

Any Amount of Books on Charing Cross Road, London in a street committed to ­bookselling, this shop stands out for its rapid turnover, eclectic stock and reasonable prices. Outside, there are £1 paperbacks and the basement is given over to ­bargains. Curiosities are paraded in the window display, which alters daily, and the main shop floor is a general mix of literature and non-fiction. For £10-£15 you can buy tooled leather bindings to give your living room that stately home library ambience. A different stock is available in an online catalogue. 56 Charing Cross Road, London (Anna Tims)

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And once the storm is over you won’t remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won’t even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over. But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.
Haruki MurakamiKafka on the Shore (via bookmania)

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sketchmocha:

thehotgirlproject:

thats-not-victorian:

lilith-et-adalia:

Thought this might be a little helpful, we hope it’s not wrong!!

And just for a little added context:

  • Elizabethan:  refers to Elizabeth I, who reigned from 1558 to 1603 (this is part of the Tudor era, as well)
  • Baroque:  an art movement that began around 1600 and lasted until the early 18th century.  
  • Rococo: an art movement created in a direct response to Baroque (sometimes called “Late Baroque”), which lasted from about the 1710s to around the time of the French Revolution (depending on the historian you ask).
  • Georgian:  refers to the rules of Georges I, II, III, and IV (1714 to 1830).  
  • Regency:  the time when George IV ascended the throne due to his father’s mental illness.  It technically lasted from 1811 to 1820, but some will use this term for all pre-Victorian 19th century.  
  • Victorian:  Queen Victoria’s reign from 1837 to 1901 (but will sometimes be considered to start earlier due to the Reform Act of 1832)

otherwise known as dope ass dresses

Bask in the clearly identified art periods! Bask!

(Source: Lilith-et-Adalia, via mydragoncaneatyou)

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After all, reading is arguably a far more creative and imaginative process than writing; when the reader creates emotion in their head, or the colors of the sky during the setting sun, or the smell of a warm summer’s breeze on their face, they should reserve as much praise for themselves as they do for the writer — perhaps more.
Jasper Fforde, The Well of Lost Plots (via bookmania)